Blue Waffle STD is said to cause the vulva to turn blue. Talks about this disease are spreading all over the internet.

Key takeaways:
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    Blue Waffle is a fictional disease that is said to cause the vulva to turn blue.
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    It is possible for the color of the vulva to change due to hormonal shifts.
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    Although Blue Waffle STD is not real, you should still take precautions to avoid contracting other types of STDs.
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    Being aware of different types of STDs and the potential symptoms is an effective way to stay healthy and prevent transmission.

However, the question remains whether it's a real thing or just a symptom of a real sexually transmitted disease?

Is Blue Waffle a real disease?

No, Blue Waffle is not a real disease. This made-up disease supposedly causes the vulva to turn blue. Not everything that you read on the internet is true and Blue Waffle is a clear example of an internet hoax or rumor. The origins of this fake disease are not entirely clear. It is important to be aware of real STDs and their symptoms to prevent and remain proactive in case strange symptoms do arise.

Blue Waffle symptoms that can reveal real STIs

Even though Blue Waffle is not real, if you have unusual symptoms they may indicate another type of sexually transmitted infection. Blue Waffle is said to cause discoloration of the vulva, causing it to turn blue. Those who spread the rumors of this fake disease also state that it can cause swelling, vaginal irritation, and abnormal discharge as well.

Hormonal changes such as those associated with pregnancy and puberty can sometimes lead to a darkening of the vulva that may cause it to appear blue. Symptoms such as vaginal irritation and abnormal discharge may indicate an infection called vaginitis, which can be transmitted sexually or can have other causes as well. Other common STDs include chlamydia, bacterial vaginosis, gonorrhea, genital herpes, HPV, and vaginal yeast infection.

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common STD that can be transmitted through vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chlamydia does not always cause symptoms and when symptoms do occur it can take weeks following infection. If chlamydia goes untreated it can lead to more severe complications such as affecting fertility.

Common symptoms of chlamydia include:

  • Painful urination;
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge (in women);
  • Abnormal discharge from the penis (in men);
  • Pain during sex.

Bacterial vaginosis

Bacterial vaginosis is a common vaginal infection that occurs when the bacteria that is normally found in the vagina becomes off balance. Sex is not always the cause of this infection but it can sometimes be. Any activity that throws off the pH balance of the vagina can lead to BV.

Common symptoms of bacterial vaginosis include:

  • A white or gray vaginal discharge;
  • Vaginal discomfort such as pain, itching, and burning;
  • Pain when urinating;
  • A strong vaginal odor.

Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea infects the mucous membranes of the reproductive tract, such as the cervix, uterus, urethra, and fallopian tubes. This STD can be spread through vaginal, anal, or oral sex and it can affect both men and women. Gonorrhea can be passed from mother to baby during childbirth if a pregnant woman is infected with the disease.

Common symptoms of gonorrhea include:

  • Painful urination;
  • Abnormal discharge from the vagina;
  • Genital pain or swelling.

Genital herpes

There are two different types of herpes simplex virus (HSV): HSV-1 and HSV-2. Herpes is most often spread through sexual transmission. Genital herpes is usually caused by HSV-2. There is no permanent cure for genital herpes, once it has been contracted it remains in the body indefinitely. Genital herpes goes dormant and can be reactivated at any time. Symptoms of genital herpes usually start around 2 to 12 days after being exposed to the virus. Herpes symptoms are mild and sometimes absent altogether.

Common symptoms of genital herpes include:

  • Pain and itching near the genitals;
  • Bumps or blisters near the genitals, anus, or mouth;
  • Pain during urination.

HPV virus

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common type of sexually transmitted infection. HPV will affect most sexually active people at some point and there are more than 200 different types of HPV. HPV can be contracted through skin contact and sometimes causes genital warts. Some strains of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Most cases of HPV go away on their own within one to two years. HPV does not typically cause symptoms but it can sometimes cause genital warts which are painless bumps around the vagina, penis, or anus.

Vaginal yeast infection

Yeast infections are not STDs since they can have other causes other than sex. Sexual activity could potentially increase a person’s odds of developing a yeast infection. Yeast infections are caused by a fungus called candida. Common symptoms of yeast infection include itchiness and thick white vaginal discharge. Usually, yeast infections are treated by prescription antifungal drugs or topical antifungal creams.

How should I know if I need testing for STIs?

Pretty much anyone who is sexually active can benefit from STD testing. Some circumstances that make STD testing more crucial include:

  • If you are starting to have sex with a new partner;
  • If you are experiencing symptoms that indicate a potential STD;
  • If a recent sexual partner of yours had a positive STD test;
  • If you regularly have sex with multiple people your sexual partner has sex with other people.

Even if you are in a monogamous sexual relationship, it is still a good idea to get an STD test if you’ve never had one before.

What STI testing is available?

Talk with your doctor about what types of STIs you can and should be tested for. Some common STDs that your doctor can screen you for include:

  • Gonorrhea;
  • Chlamydia;
  • Syphilis;
  • HIV.

HPV is typically tested during a routine pap smear for women. For men, there is not currently an official test for HPV.

How to prevent STIs

Practicing safe sex can help you prevent contracting an STI or STD. Some tips to help prevent STIs include:

  • Use barrier protection (such as condoms) when having sex;
  • Get tested for STDs before having sex with a new partner;
  • Talk with any sexual partners to ensure that they have been tested as well.

If someone you’ve had sex with informs you that they’ve tested positive for an STD, see your doctor as soon as possible so that you can get tested yourself.

STI vs STD: What is the difference?

STIs and STDs are two different terms that describe the same thing. STI stands for sexually transmitted infection. STD stands for sexually transmitted disease. Both are types of diseases that are spread through sexual contact. There are many different types of STDs and STIs that your doctor can screen you for at your next visit if you have concerns. In addition to STDs, there are other types of infections that can affect sexual health that might not inherently be caused by sex, including yeast infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs).

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Comments

Dillima Lingam Dillima Lingam
prefix 7 days ago
It is very good information about some myths regarding the curing of both HIV and hepatitis C infection. It was somewhat useful for many including me. It is a must-read blog to explore the new info about