Female Squirting: Common Questions Answered

The phenomenon of squirting remains a mystery to many. As the research into squirting is limited, many people have a lot of questions they'd like to ask about the phenomenon. Is female squirting real? Let’s explore this question along with other common questions below.

Key takeaways:

How female squirting happens?

Squirting is the involuntary expulsion of clear fluid from the urethra which happens when a person with a vulva is sexually aroused — either before or during orgasm. Squirting usually occurs from stimulation of the G-spot, but it can also happen from clitoral stimulation or a combination of the two. Liquid squirts from the urethra in a fast motion, which is where the name comes from, but it can also gush from the urethra. Squirting is a natural sexual occurrence for some people and is totally healthy and nothing to be ashamed of. The research examining squirting is relatively new. Scientists and many other folks are still debating the origins of the liquid and exactly why it happens.

Research on the prevalence of squirting

Of the research that has been conducted, it is estimated that around 5% of people with vaginas squirt. But as squirting isn't the easiest thing to study, the prevalence rate could be much higher.

Furthermore, research on the prevalence of squirting typically includes female ejaculation within the prevalence rate. Considering both phenomena together, the estimated prevalence rate increases significantly, ranging from 10-54%.

Squirting vs. female ejaculation

Scientists do know that squirting and female ejaculation are two different phenomena. Female ejaculation differs from squirting as it is a thick, white fluid secreted from the Skene's glands, which are two small ducts that sit on either side of the urethra. These glands are made from the same cells that develop into the prostate for those with male reproductive anatomy. Therefore, they are often called the "female prostate."

People can experience female ejaculation during sexual arousal and orgasm. The liquid secreted differs from squirting liquid and has been found to contain prostate-specific antigen and glucose, similar to what is found in the male ejaculate. The liquid secreted during female ejaculation is much less volume than squirting, at around two tablespoons, and differs from vaginal lubrication.

Tips on how to squirt

While not everyone may be able to squirt, there are a few things that you can try to increase your likelihood of squirting:

  1. Set the mood. If you're looking to explore your body, it's essential that you set the mood first. Set aside time to focus on yourself, either by yourself or with a partner. Turn your phone on silent, lock the door, and create an environment that allows you to feel comfortable and turned on.
  2. Use lube. Generally, sex is always a lot more fun and pleasurable when lube is involved. If you're looking to explore squirting, using lube will definitely help you out. Use it when using toys, fingers, or during penetrative sex.
  3. Stimulate the G-spot. Squirting often comes from stimulating the G-spot, so try stimulating this area with fingers, a toy, or a penis. To find the most pleasurable spot, insert your or a partner's fingers into your vagina, with the fingertips facing toward the belly. Press up into the vagina with your fingers in a "come here" motion, and play around this area until you find what feels good. Once you find that spot, spend some time there, getting curious about your body and its responses.
  4. Use toys. Some people find that toys designed to stimulate the G-spot help them squirt more easily than fingers or penetrative sex. Many types of toys out there stimulate the G-spot, so have fun exploring some of them.
  5. Try different positions. During penetrative sex, some people find that they can squirt only in certain positions, like being penetrated from behind. When using toys or fingers, many people can squirt by having a partner gently press down on their stomach, just above the pubic bone, increasing the pressure in the pelvic area. Get creative and explore multiple different positions.
  6. Let go. Many people find that they are able to squirt once they have let go and pushed past the feeling of needing to pee. This build-up of pressure and feeling like you need to pee can be hard to ignore and may take some practice.
  7. Have fun. It’s important to remember that while squirting may be a lot of fun, it's not the only way to experience pleasure. There are many ways we can experience intense sexual pleasure without having to squirt, and putting too much pressure on yourself to do so may decrease your chances of it happening. The most important thing is exploring your body and finding what feels good.

For some people, squirting is a natural response to sexual stimulation and happens involuntarily, but this isn't the case for everyone. Although most people with vaginas have the same anatomical makeup, many people are not able to experience squirting. Scientists aren't exactly sure why this is as much more research needs to be conducted on squirting. Not being able to squirt is perfectly fine and healthy, and nothing is wrong with you if you cannot squirt — there’s plenty of pleasure to be had aside from squirting.

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