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Studies: Vibrators Are Good for Women


Research into women's use of vibrators has found that they are beneficial in improving overall well-being, improving sexual functions and sexual health, strengthening the pelvic floor muscles, reducing incontinence, improving sexual satisfaction, and reducing sexual pain. Although there are many benefits to women's use of vibrators, the research is limited.

A large study in 2010 surveyed 2056 women aged 18-60 years old and found that vibrator use was very common, with approximately 53% of women reporting using a vibrator. Additionally, partnered vibrator use was common across all sexualities, including heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual women. Given the high uses of vibrators, research into their benefits is relatively limited. However, there are some interesting findings.

An orgasm improves sleep quality

Although not specifically related to vibrator use, studies examining the benefits of orgasms in women have found that those who masturbated before bed reported better sleep quality and onset. Using a vibrator may assist in achieving orgasm and could replace the need for pharmaceutical treatments for sleep issues.

Sex improves overall well-being

Many studies have found that sex and orgasms, in general, improve women's overall physical and psychological well-being. Studies focusing solely on vibrator use have found that women who use their vibrators during sexual activity with their partners had higher rates of sexual satisfaction. Using a vibrator allows women to explore their bodies and find what feels pleasurable to them, and this knowledge can then be communicated to a partner to enhance partnered sex.

Vibrators help to strengthen pelvic floor muscles

Studies have also found that using vibrators strengthens the pelvic floor muscles, which helps to treat incontinence and other pelvic floor issues, reducing urinary symptoms and the need for pads for women with stress urinary incontinence. Using a vibrator stimulates the pelvic floor muscles and promotes blood flow to the region, and the involuntary contraction of these muscles is strengthened during orgasm, leading to healthier pelvic floor functioning.

Vibrators improve sexual dysfunctions

Vibrators have been found to increase sexual desire and arousal in women. As such, they are often used to treat common sexual dysfunctions in women, such as female sexual interest/ arousal disorder and female orgasmic disorder. The use of vibrators for women experiencing desire, arousal, and orgasm dysfunctions allows them to explore pleasure, experience sexual arousal, and increase orgasmic response.

One study found that women who had positive beliefs surrounding vibrator use reported higher rates of arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and satisfaction compared to women who viewed vibrator use negatively. Other studies have found that those who use vibrators are more proactive in caring for their sexual health.

Vibrators can reduce sexual pain

The use of vibrators has been found to reduce sexual pain and period pain. A study examining women's use of vibrators as a method to help treat vulvodynia (pain around the entrance to the vagina), and dyspareunia (pain during intercourse), found that 73% percent of women found that sex was less painful after using a vibrator over the period of five months. Additionally, 83% of these women said that vibration therapy was an acceptable treatment for sexual pain, and 88% would recommend using a vibrator to other women who experienced sexual pain. Vulvar vibration therapy was effective for these women as vibrations and pressure from the toy were applied to the vulva and pelvic floor to decrease muscle tension and tenderness, much the same as a massage on other areas of the body.

Another study found that using a vibrator along with vaginal dilators assisted in treating genito-pelvic pain penetration disorder.

Vibrator use has also been found to help reduce menstrual pain, with a study conducted by vibrator company Womanizer finding that masturbation with and without the use of vibrators helped reduce the severity of period pain for 70% of women. Additionally, 90% of women would recommend masturbation as a method to decrease period pain to their friends.

Conclusion

While there isn’t a lot of research examining the benefits of vibrator use for women, there do seem to be many benefits. Women using vibrators have been found to have higher sexual satisfaction, have a higher interest in maintaining their sexual health, and have higher rates of arousal, vaginal lubrication, and orgasms. Additionally, vibrators have been found to aid in treating several sexual dysfunctions, including female sexual interest/ arousal disorder, female orgasmic disorder, and genito-pelvic pain penetration disorder. More broadly, masturbation has been found to improve sleep quality and aid in reducing period pain.

Key takeaways

There are many benefits associated with women's vibrator use, including higher sexual satisfaction, increases in arousal, vaginal lubrication, orgasms, and general physical and psychological well-being.

Vibrator use has also been found to assist in treating many common sexual dysfunctions in women, including female sexual interest/ arousal disorder, female orgasmic disorder, and genito-pelvic pain penetration disorder.

In the United States, vibrator use among women is very common and is used in solo and partnered settings for women of many sexual identities.

Resources:

Women's Vibrator Use in Sexual Partnerships: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey in the United States - Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy

Sex and Sleep: Perceptions of Sex as a Sleep Promoting Behavior in the General Adult Population - Frontiers in Public Health

Is It Time For FPMRS To Prescribe Vibrators? - The Journal of Urology

Beliefs About Women's Vibrator Use: Results From a Nationally Representative Probability Survey in the United States - Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy

Patient Perceptions Of Vulvar Vibration Therapy For Refractory Vulvar Pain - Journal of the British Association for Sexual and Relationship Therapy

Qualitative Accounts Of Patients' Determinants Of Vaginal Dilator Use After Pelvic Radiotherapy - The Journal of Sexual Medicine

Masturbation: The Natural Painkiller? The Results of the Menstrubation Study - Womanizer

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